A One-Month-Old Baby’s Growth And Development

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Babies undergo significant changes during the first year of their lives. In less than a year, your newborn starts to move around, speak (or attempt to), and show initial signs of autonomy. Your one-month-old baby starts getting used to the strange, new world, as the parents become experienced in taking care of their many needs.

It is worth noting that babies tend to behave differently during their first month, and all may not exhibit similar behavioral characteristics. If a baby is prematurely born, they may take some extra time before they catch up with their peers in terms of their character. Here are some of the changes you should expect in your baby during the first month.

Body Development

You shouldn’t be worried if your one-month-old baby sheds some weight. At delivery, most babies have extra body fluid and usually shed about 10 per cent of their body weight prior to stabilizing and starting to gain. Before the end of two weeks, the weight of the baby should be the same as during its delivery. By the end of the first month, babies rapidly gain weight at an average of about half an ounce every day. It is important during your postnatal visits to inquire from your doctor if your baby is developing at the appropriate pace.

Nervous System

Your one-month-old baby continues to develop its motor skills, and some babies achieve a lot of development in their first four weeks. From delivery, your baby has several intrinsic reflexes, such as sucking. Soon after delivery, with a little help from you, they will be able to bolt on your nipple to feed. The baby grasps your finger if you put it in their palm, and you will be able to gauge its strength at this tender age.

Excited babies will flip their arms and legs as a motor reflex. Most surprisingly, your one-month-old baby will try to walk if you support their body with their feet on the floor. Although babies who are one-month-old have the ability to turn their heads when lying on their back, they may not have the neck strength to support their head while standing. So, it is important to support the head of your baby when lifting them.

Sleep

From delivery, all the baby wants is to feed and spend their time sleeping. Indeed, babies spend more than 15 hours a day sleeping. Because your one-month-old baby is yet to adapt to the normal day and night cycle, their sleep patterns are inconsistent. To help your baby adjust, limit most activities to daytime, and quietly do things in the dark or at night. With time, your baby will learn that the day is for play and night is meant for sleep.

It’s important to note that the sleep cycle of the one-month-old baby is distinct from an adult’s. Newborns spend most of their time in REM sleep (Rapid eye movement sleep) than in non-REM sleep. This is the main reason they awaken easily during their first few weeks.

Common Sense

  • Eyesight: At delivery, babies have very blurry eyesight. They can only see things that are just a few inches away. This means they can clearly see your face when nursing, and they prefer staring at you than at fancy objects within their vicinity. An object with a higher contrast is easier to spot for a one-month-old baby If you place the object near their eyes, then you will notice when they try to focus. You should contact your pediatrician if your baby continues closing its eyes during this time after three months.
  • Hearing: Newborns have underdeveloped hearing senses, although they can recognize sounds — particularly the voices of their parents, which they started hearing in the womb. One-month-old babies respond to high-pitched sounds. If you notice that your baby is not responding to sounds, it is important to inform your pediatrician.
  • Taste and Smell: Just like adults and older children, babies love sweet tastes. They may not distinguish between bitter and sour tastes because their taste buds are yet to develop fully. Surprisingly, your one-month-old baby is very sensitive to smell. They can detect the scent of breastmilk or their mother’s nipple only a few days after delivery.

Feeding

If you choose to breastfeed your baby, you should do so at least eight times every day—about after every two to three hours. Feed up to six times a day if you are bottle feeding your baby. As a parent, you can either feed your baby on a schedule or when you realize that they are hungry — when they start moving their head in search of a breast or become persnickety if you touch their cheek. After feeding enough, the baby may look satisfied or even fall asleep. Six wet diapers a day is a clear indication that your baby is feeding well.

Communication

Your one-month-old baby communicates by crying. It is normal for one-month-old babies to cry up to three times in a day. You shouldn’t be worried if crying decreases as days pass by. Crying can be an indication that your baby is hungry, tired, or has a wet diaper. If your baby tends to cry too much, it could be an indication that they have colic or an illness, and you should contact your doctor immediately.

Conclusion

From delivery, babies do undergo tremendous changes throughout their first month. Most of their body organs continue to develop gradually from the first day in this world. You shouldn’t be worried by these normal changes, though something unusual should be reported to a pediatrician during the postnatal clinic.

May your baby have a tremendous growth!

Resources:

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/baby-development-1-month

https://www.glozine.com/lifestyle/health

https://www.consumerhealthdigest.com/health-center/

Featured photo credit: Shutterstock via shutterstock.com

The post A One-Month-Old Baby’s Growth And Development appeared first on Lifehack.

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